Tag Archives: cypher

Neo4j is faster than MySQL in performing recursive query

5mysql

A user on StackOverflow was wondering about the performance between Neo4j and MySQL for performing a recursive query. They started with Neo4j performing the query in 240 seconds. Then an optimized cypher query got them down to 40 seconds. Then I got them down to…
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Writing a Cypher Stored Procedure

luke-cage-jidenna

I’ve been so busy these last 6 months I just finally got around to watching Luke Cage on Netflix. The season 1 episode 5 intro is Jidenna performing “Long live the Chief” and it made me pause the series while I figured out who that was. I’m mostly a hard rock and heavy metal guy, but I do appreciate great pieces of lyrical work and this song made me take notice. Coincidently on the Neo4j Users Slack (get an invite) @sleo asked…
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Enabling Legacy Automatic Full Text Search on Neo4j 3.x

solar-elastic-lucene

Neo4j 3.x has made inroads toward Full Text Search capabilities using Cypher keywords “STARTS WITH”, “ENDS WITH” and “CONTAINS”. However this search capability is limited to a single Schema Index and can be a problem when you need a very flexible search interface. To search across multiple models you can do this trick:
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Speeding up Traversals

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A few folks have come to us recently with the need to trace lineages of nodes of variable depth many hops away. You can run into this need if you are looking at the ancestries of living things, tracing data as it flows through an ETL, large network connectivity maps, etc. These types of queries tend to be murder on relational databases because of the massive recursive joins they have to deal with. Let’s give them a try in Neo4j.
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Scaling Cypher Writes

salt-pepa-writes

Let’s talk about writes, baby. Let’s talk about you and me. Let’s talk about all the good things. And the bad things that may be. Let’s talk about writes, and indexing and batching, and transactions in Neo4j. Let’s start with my environment. A 3 year old MacBook Pro (dying to get the new ones… once they finally come out) running a 4 core 2.3 GHz Intel Core i7 that is hyper-threading and pretending to have 8. An Apple SM256E SSD that is about average as far as SSDs go. So definitely not a production grade server, so bear that in mind.
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Benchmarks and Superchargers

Interceptor

For the most part, I hate competitive benchmarks. The vendor who publishes them always seems to come out on top regardless. The numbers are always amazing, but once you start digging in a little bit you start to see faults in what is actually being measured and it never applies to real world workloads. For example you have Cassandra claiming 1 Million writes per second on 300 servers. Then Aerospike claiming 1 Million writes per second on 50 servers. MongoDB claiming almost 32k writes per second on a single server, but claiming Cassandra can only do 6k w/s and Couch can only do 1.2k w/s on a single server… Then ScyllaDB has almost 2 Million writes per second on 3 servers blowing everybody away.
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Flight Search with the Neo4j Traversal API

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Before Cypher came along, if you wanted to describe a graph traversal in Neo4j you would use the Traversal Framework Java API. The Traversal API is one of the many hidden gems of Neo4j and today we are going to take a closer look at it. Traversing a graph is about going on a journey. All journeys have a starting point (or points) so that’s the first thing we have to do, figure out where in the graph we begin. It can be a single node, or multiple ones, but they will go on the journey following the same rules, so its easier if it’s just one node or nodes of the same “type”.
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Importing the Hacker News Interest Graph

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Graphs are everywhere. Think about the computer networks that allow you to read this sentence, the road or train networks that get you to work, the social network that surrounds you and the interest graph that holds your attention. Everywhere you look, graphs. If you manage to look somewhere and you don’t see a graph, then you may be looking at an opportunity to build one. Today we are going to do just that. We are going to make use of the new Neo4j Import tool to build a graph of the things that interest Hacker News.
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Giving Neo4j 2.2 a Workout

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Neo4j 2.2 is getting released any day now, so let’s put the Release Candidate through its paces with Gatling. Once we download and start it up, you’ll notice it wants us to authenticate.
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Translating Cypher To Neo4j Java API 2.0

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About 6 months ago we looked at how to translate a few lines of Cypher in to way too much Java code in version 1.9.x. Since then Cypher has changed and I suck a little less at Java, so I wanted to share a few different ways to translate one into the other just in case you stuck in a mid-eighties time warp and are paid by the number of lines of code you write per hour.

But first, lemme take a #Selfie let’s make some data. Michael Hunger has a series of blog posts on getting and creating data in Neo4j, we’ll steal borrow his ideas. Let’s create 100k nodes:

WITH ["Jennifer","Michelle","Tanya","Julie","Christie","Sophie","Amanda","Khloe","Sarah","Kaylee"] AS names 
FOREACH (r IN range(0,100000) | CREATE (:User {username:names[r % size(names)]+r}))

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