Tag Archives: relationship graph

Let’s build something Outrageous – Part 24: Permissions and Multiple Graphs

Typically we want to Reduce, Reuse and Recycle to help the environment. But today we are going to Reduce, Reuse and Recycle the Lua Sandbox Environment to give us two additional sets of permissions. The first is “Read Write” in which a user can read and write to the database but cannot create new types of nodes or relationships or data types. The second is “Read Only” which does what it sounds like.

While we’re here, we’re going to one graph, two graph, rage graph, blue graph our way to multi database support. Let’s jump in:

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Let’s build something Outrageous – Part 22: Seeing Results

“That a lie which is half a truth is ever the blackest of lies” — Alfred Tennyson. Before embarking on the journey of achieving something great, you are often told to imagine having already done it. This is the pseudo scientific belief that visualizing a positive outcome helps one achieve it. It propelled “The Secret” to sell 30 million copies worldwide. However, it isn’t the outcome we are supposed to be fantasizing about, but rather the execution of the actions required to accomplish our goal.

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Let’s build something Outrageous – Part 16: Adding a UI

For some crazy reason I thought I could get away with building RageDB without a UI. I was using the “Advanced REST Client” to test functionality, it has served me well for the last few months, but it’s time we added a few coats of paint to our database server and let users interact with the graph visually instead of by squinting at JSON outputs. As a primarily back-end dev, building a front end is a scary proposition. I am barely getting the hang of C++ (yeah right) and now I’m going to have to write a bunch of Javascript and Node and React… no.

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Faux Bitmap Indexes in Neo4j

If you’ve ever watched my talks about Neo4j, I tend to say we’re not very well optimized for Single Model queries where relationships aren’t considered. In fact, we’re kinda bad at it. Things got better when Composite Indexes were introduced, but we still have some limitations to deal with. Today we’re going to explore the issues and build our own faux “bitmap indexes” to get around this problem.
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Marketing Activities

The “footprints in the sand” poem is a story of a person walking on the beach with God and seeing two sets of footprints. The footprints represent the joys and sorrows of this persons life. During the worst of times the trail shows just one set of footprints. Confused as to why they would be abandoned at their time of need, God replies that “when you see only one set of footprints, it was then that I carried you”. It’s a touching poem, but a single set of footprints in the sand isn’t very graphy. Things get interesting when you superimpose the paths one over the other. We can then start to see where many paths converged and diverged, see how deep the footprints got at times, when they split where they went and where did they end up.
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Building a Chat Bot in Neo4j Part 2

In part one our this building a chatbot series, we figured out how to use OpenNLP to “hear” what a user is saying and figure out both their intent and any entities they may have mentioned. Today we’re going to learn how to use Neo4j to talk back… like an impudent child.

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Building a Chat Bot in Neo4j

Last year eBay built a chatbot using Neo4j. Unfortunately we have grown so big I didn’t get a chance to work on that project and kinda feel left out. So I decided I’m going to build my own chatbot with Neo4j. As usual I’ve never done this before, have very little idea what I’m doing, have no team, and have barely any time to get this done. So with those disclaimers out of the way, let’s see what we can do.
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Finding Fraud Part Two

In the last blog post, we saw how we can use Neo4j to find the merchants where credit card fraud originated or was used for testing stolen data in order to prevent further fraudulent charges. It stemmed from a webinar on our amazing youtube channel with has hundreds of videos about graphs and Neo4j. We will continue diving in to the technical details by looking at how Neo4j can help you find Fraud Rings. The way this fraud works is that a large set of synthetic accounts are created and act like normal customers. Over time they request higher and higher levels of credit which they pay back on time. Then they all request the maximum credit they can get, take out the money, and disappear! Let’s find them before this happens.

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Finding Fraud

It’s no secret that one of our hottest use cases lately has been Fraud Detection. A while back we did a webinar talking about some of the ways you could use Neo4j to fight fraud. Watch it, if you haven’t yet. Today I want to augment that webinar with some cypher queries. Let’s see how it works:
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Parallel K-Hop Counts

As a foreigner I was a little perplexed the first time I went to IHOP. You are served a stack of pancakes 3-5 high. How do you eat them? Do you pour syrup over the top and cut down through all the layers and eat them that way… or do you unstack them, pour syrup over each one and eat one at a time? If you are American, you eat them stacked. If you see someone eat them one at a time, you know they are shape-shifting lizard people. But doesn’t that mean the bottom layers are dry and don’t get any butter or syrup on them? Well you would think, but Americans are an ingenious people and they found a way to fix that problem. More syrup, more and more, and then a bit more to be sure… and a side of bacon. Now that you know all about IHOP, let’s switch gears to KHOP. Let’s say you wanted to find out how many nodes there were k-hops away from a starting node. What would be the best way to do that?

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