Tag Archives: relationship graph

Network Routing in Neo4j

People use Neo4j to manage enterprise architectures all the time. If you haven’t seen this presentation from Thomas Lawrence from Amadeus, then you owe it to yourself to watch it. But what about lower level networks? Can we use Neo4j to model routing in a physical network? Of course we can, and today I’ll show you how.

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Calculating the best Rail Road paths in Neo4j

Did you know that Chicago is the most important railroad center in North America? Chicago has more lines of track radiating in more directions than from any other city. The windy city has long been the most important interchange point for freight traffic between the nation’s major railroads and it is the hub of Amtrak, the intercity rail passenger system. You may not realize it, but railroad tracks and graph theory have a history together. Back in the mid 1950s the US Military had an interest in finding out how much capacity the Soviet railway network had to move cargo from the Western Soviet Union to Eastern Europe. This lead to the Maximum Flow problem and the Ford–Fulkerson algorithm to solve it.

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Dynamic Rule Based Decision Trees in Neo4j – Part 4

So far I’ve only showed you how to traverse a decision tree in Neo4j. The assumption being that you would either create the rules yourself from expert knowledge or via an external algorithm. Today we’re going to add an algorithm to build a decision tree (well a decision stream) right into Neo4j. We will simply pass in the training data and let it build the tree for us. If you are reading this part without reading parts one, two, and three, you should because this builds on what we learned along the way.

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Dynamic Rule Based Decision Trees in Neo4j – Part 3

At Graph Connect this year I did a short lightning talk on building Decision Trees using Neo4j. The slides are up and down below, the video is up. After the talk, someone asked, “What if we don’t know all the facts ahead of time?”. They wanted to be able to step through the tree and ask for the facts as needed at each step. So today we’re going to see how to do that.
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Finding your neighbors using Neo4j

In Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood, the question “Won’t you be my neighbor?” is an invitation for somebody to be close to you. In graphs, it’s an invitation to traverse. The closest neighbors of a node are those reachable by a single relationship hop, but we can also consider nodes two, three or more hops away our neighbors as well. How can we find them in Neo4j? Using the “star”:
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Multiple origin multiple destination 3 relationships queries for knowledge graphs using Neo4j

The multiple-origin-multiple-destination (MOMD) problem is an NP-Hard problem sometimes seen in logistics planning where paths can stretch out really far. A far simpler problem presents itself when we limit the size of the paths. Now you may be wondering, why would we do that? Well… outside logistics we have plenty of graphs where relevance drops as we get further and further away. Think about an Article on Wikipedia. It has links to many other articles that are relevant, and those have links to other articles that are relevant to them but less relevant to our starting Article, and those have links to other articles that may be relevant to them, but have very little to do with our starting Article. I think if we keep going we end up in Philosophy or something like that.
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Building a Dating site with Neo4j – Part Twelve

It’s time to add “visions of love” to our dating site. So far our posts have been just text status updates and while it is possible to fall in love with someone’s words, it’s harder if they look like the troll that lives under the bridge. So what’s the plan here? Well… like most databases out there, it’s not a good idea to store images in Neo4j. What we are going to store instead is a link to where the image resides… but we also don’t want to deal with having images all over our file system and then having to worry about storage space and replicating them, geographically distributing them for faster access, etc. Hosting images is a problem solved by the use of Content Delivery Networks. So let’s leverage one and build our feature.
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Building a Dating site with Neo4j – Part Nine

Now that our users can high five and low five each other, we want to show the other person those high fives and low fives. Well…do we really want to show the low fives? I’m not sure. A few years ago we talked about how to store the people who “swiped left” on a user (aka the “asholes” of Tinder). In this case, the user is not rejecting a person forever, they are just putting down one of their posts. If it’s two people who are competing for dates, then maybe the low five has a negative intent, but it would make the person who wrote the post feel they are doing something right. If the low five was from a potential mate, it could be a case of “negging” ( which is stupid and you should never do that to people), it could be in jest if it was from someone they already had a conversation with, it could just have negative intent or maybe a clumsy tap on the wrong button. We don’t really know.
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Building a Dating site with Neo4j – Part Seven

Now it is time to create the timeline for our users. Most of the time, the user wants to see posts from people they could High Five in order to elicit a conversation. Sometimes, they want to see what their competition is doing and what kind of posts are getting responses… also who they can low five. I don’t think they don’t want to see messages from people who are not like them and don’t want to date them but I could be wrong.
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Building a Dating site with Neo4j – Part Five

You ever eaten at a “Fusion Cuisine” type of restaurant? It’s a bit of a gamble. Personally I’m always up for eating just about anything… except Pho. That stuff messes me up. But back to fusion cuisine. I think my favorite is Indian and Mexican. Take your favorite Indian dish, wrap that in the warm embrace that is a burrito tortilla, heaven. Well, just about anything wrapped in a burrito is perfect. Why am I taking about Fusion and Wrapping stuff? Well, today we are going to add Auto Complete into our Dating Site, but before we can do that I need to talk to you about Neo4j’s Fusion Indexes and how they wrap the Lucene Indexes as well as our generation-aware B+tree (GB+Tree) indexes.
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