Tag Archives: graph databases

Keeping Properties Secret in Neo4j

We’re an open source company with nothing to hide, but some of our customers have things they need to keep close to their chest. Sometimes you don’t want everybody to have access to salary information, or future predictions. Maybe you want to hide Personally identifiable information (PII) or Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) data. In Neo4j 3.4 we are introducing more security controls. We are starting with Role based Database wide property key blacklists. That’s a bit of a mouthful but let’s walk through and example to see one of the ways it can be utilized. Imagine you are working in “Area 51” and have to deal with very important information.
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Neptune and Uranus

Last year Microsoft announced “Cosmos DB”, a multi-modal database with graph support. I think multi-modal databases are like swiss army knifes, they can do everything, just not very well. I imagine you would design it to be as good as it can be at its main use case while not losing the ability to do other things. So it’s neither fully optimized for its main thing, nor very good at the other things. Maybe you can do pretty well with two things by making a few compromises, but if you try to do everything…it’s just not going to work out.

Can you imagine John Rambo stalking his enemies with an oversized swiss army knife? Here, let me help with the mental image:
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Dynamic Rule Based Decision Trees in Neo4j

A few posts ago I showed you how to build a Boolean Logic Rules Engine in Neo4j. What I like about it is that we’ve pre-calculated all our potential paths, so it’s just a matter of matching up our facts to the paths to get to the rule and we’re done. But today I am going to show you a different approach where we are going to have to calculate what is true as we go along a decision tree to see which answer we get to.

Yes, it will be a bit slower than the first approach, but we avoid pre-calculation. It also makes things a bit more dynamic, as we can change the decision tree variables on the fly. The idea is to merge code and data into one, to gain the benefit of agility.

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Bill of Materials in Neo4j

Where is da BOM? The above question asks, and the obvious answer is right in the middle of your organization. Nestled between Manufacturing, Design, Sales and Supply Chain. But I have a better answer. Your Bill of Materials should be in Neo4j. Today, I’ll show you why.
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Counting Nodes with Multiple Labels

We have over 6000 users in our #neo4j-users slack channel and get all kinds of requests. About a month ago Thomas Shields asked:

Should counting the set of things with 2 labels really take so long? I’ve got 48M nodes with LabelA and LabelB and the query `MATCH (n:LabelA:LabelB) RETURN COUNT(n)` is taking 80-90 seconds

Let’s see what’s going on by creating a small version of his graph. We will create 1M nodes of LabelA, then 1M nodes with both LabelA and LabelB, and then 1M nodes with just Label B:
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Work Order Management with Neo4j

I look terrible in a bikini (take my word for it) but I’d love me a Lamborghini. However, in order to afford nice things, we need to do as the song says and get to work…and we need to manage and prioritize that work somehow. Today, I’m going to show you how to build part of a work order management system with Neo4j.

I’m going to build an evented work order model. So let’s say our Order gets created, then based on what it is, pieces of Work need to happen. This work is performed by some Provider (whether internal or external) and that work can be broken down into Tasks that have dependencies on Events that have occurred. How would this look like in the graph? Glad you asked:
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Using a Cuckoo Filter for Unique Relationships

We often see a pattern in Neo4j applications where a user wants to create one and only one relationship between two nodes. For example a User follows another User on a social network. We don’t want to accidentally create a second follows relationship because that may create errors such as duplicate entries on their feed, or errors unfollowing or blocking them, or even skew recommendation algorithms. Also it is just plain wasteful, and while an occasional duplicate relationship won’t be a big deal, millions of them could.

So how do we deal with this?
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Building a Twitter Clone with Neo4j – Part Eight

In our last post we started the front end of our Twitter Clone application and managed to register and login a user. Now we need to build the actual functionality of our application. We’re going to need a screen to display the timeline of the logged in user. A screen to display a single users posts, and a screen to display the followers of a user and the users being followed. All of these should fit within the same main template, so maybe we can start with that.

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Building a Twitter Clone with Neo4j – Part Six

We are getting close to wrapping up the back-end API for our Twitter clone, so thank you for sticking with this awfully long series since the beginning. One of the big community features of Twitter is the Trending Hashtags. It lets users know what is being talked about even if the people a user follows aren’t talking about it. It’s kind of weird in that way since part of the point of Twitter is following just a few hundred or thousand people to reduce the noise, and here we are bringing noise back in to our feed. Regardless, this is actually pretty easy to implement, so let’s have a crack at it.
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Building a Twitter Clone with Neo4j – Part Five

In part four, we continued cloning Twitter by adding hashtag and mentions functionality. Then we went beyond it by adding the ability to edit a post. So we have a social network where people can follow each other and post stuff. Today we’re adding the ability to say a user likes a post, reposts a post and the most important query of all, being finally able to see our feed or timeline.
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