Tag Archives: heroku

Facebook Graph Search with Cypher and Neo4j

Update: Facebook has disabled this application

Your app is replicating core Facebook functionality.

neo_graph_search_screen_shot

Facebook Graph Search has given the Graph Database community a simpler way to explain what it is we do and why it matters. I wanted to drive the point home by building a proof of concept of how you could do this with Neo4j. However, I don’t have six months or much experience with NLP (natural language processing). What I do have is Cypher. Cypher is Neo4j’s graph language and it makes it easy to express what we are looking for in the graph. I needed a way to take “natural language” and create Cypher from it. This was going to be a problem.
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CrunchBase on Neo4j

NeoTechnology was featured on TechCrunch after raising a Series B round, and it has an entry on CrunchBase. If you look at CrunchBase closely you’ll notice it’s a graph. Who invested in what, who co-invested, what are the common investment themes between investors, how are companies connected by board members, etc. These are questions we can ask of the graph and are well suited for graph databases.
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Hubway Data Visualization Challenge with Neo4j

Michael Hunger imported the Hubway Challenge dataset into a Neo4j graph database, and made it available for us to play with.
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NeoSocial: Connecting to Facebook with Neo4j

Social applications and Graph Databases go together like peanut butter and jelly. I’m going to walk you through the steps of building an application that connects to Facebook, pulls your friends and likes data and visualizes it. I plan on making a video of me coding it one line at a time, but for now let’s just focus on the main elements.
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Using Three.js with Neo4j

Last week we saw Sigma.js, and as promised here is a graph visualization with Three.js and Neo4j. Three.js is a lightweight 3D library, written by Mr. Doob and a small army of contributors.

The things you can do with Three.js are amazing, and my little demo here doesn’t give it justice, but nonetheless I’ll show you how to build it.
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Using Sigma.js with Neo4j

I’ve done a few posts recently using D3.js and now I want to show you how to use two other great Javascript libraries to visualize your graphs. We’ll start with Sigma.js and soon I’ll do another post with Three.js.
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Graph Visualization and Neo4j – Part Three

Like I promised in my previous post, I wanted to do a little something on D3.js.

We are going to take one of their example visualizations and visualize a follows graph.

To create our graph, we will take the names of 20 people: create nodes for them, add them to an index, and randomly link them together.
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Chicago Graph DB Meet-Up

We had our first Graph Database Meet-up in Chicago yesterday!

16 Graphistas came out to learn more about the craft and get an introduction to Neo4j. Ryan Briones from Groupon gave us a venue and helped host the event. No worries if you missed it, your next chance to learn more about Neo4j is coming up on Tuesday February 7th @ 6pm, when Prasanna Pendse will share his experiences with Neo4j at ChicagoRuby: Downtown.

Our next Chicago Graph DB meet-up is tentatively scheduled for February 29th @ 6 pm. This will be a hands-on meet-up. I’ll help you get started with either Neo4j on your laptop or in the cloud with Heroku. We’ll create a few graphs, learn some basic traversals and get comfortable with Neo4j. I’ll have a GitHub repository graph for us to play with and see how you are connected to Kevin Bacon (err I mean Linus Torvalds). He is the center of the GitHub universe right? Right? We’ll let’s find out.

The slides of our first meet-up are available below:

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Neo4j on Heroku – Part Three

This week we learned that leaving the create_graph method accessible to the world was a bad idea. So let’s go ahead and delete that route in Sinatra, and instead create a Rake Task for it.

In Rakefile:

require 'neography/tasks'
require './neoflix.rb'

namespace :neo4j do
  task :create do
    neo = Neography::Rest.new(ENV['NEO4J_URL'] || "http://localhost:7474")
    create_graph(neo)
  end
end

That’s much better. We can create our graph locally with
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Neo4j on Heroku – Part Two

We are picking up where we left off on Neo4j on Heroku –Part One so make sure you’ve read it or you’ll be a little lost. So far, we have cloned the Neoflix project, set up our Heroku application and added the Neo4j add-on to our application. We are now ready to populate our graph.

UPDATE: Learn a better way to create the graph in part 3 of my Neo4j on Heroku series.

Bring up two browser windows. On one you’ll go to your Neo4j instance running on Heroku,

$ heroku config
NEO4J_URL      => http://xxxxxxxx:yyyyyyyy@70825a524.hosted.neo4j.org:7014

and on the other you’ll go to the create_graph route of your app. So if you named your app neoflix, you’d go to neoflix dot herokuapp dot com/create_graph.

This will run the create_graph method and you’ll see nodes and relationships being created on the Neo4j Dashboard. It’s just over a million relationships, so it will take a few minutes. There are faster ways to load data into Neo4j (wait for part three of this series), but this will work in our case.
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